Commentaries

Thursday, March 23, 2017

BOKEH



MEN VS WOMEN

Film Review by Fiore 


BOKEH, an Icelandic Indie, penned and directed by Geoffrey Orthwein and Andrew Sullivan, is a snapshot film that can be interpreted as a scathing attack on men and women’s roles in culture.  I’m certain Sullivan and Orthwein wanted to display man’s inner dependence on his fellow man in the apocalyptic tale, but  instead, they unroll the horrible distinction our modern society has imposed on male and female roles, fostering the notion of male dominance in logic and common sense and the female constant craving for emotional security.

It stars Maika Monroe as Jenai and Matt O’Leary, as Riley,  in what is essentially a two-man stage presentation on celluloid.  Jenai and Riley saved money and embark on a vacation in Iceland.  I’m not sure how many people put Iceland on the top of their vacation lists, but perhaps the happy couple are huge Sigur Ros fans. 

On the first night of their idyllic escapade,  Jenai is awakened at 3:20am.  She looks out the window in time to see a spectacular nighttime light show across the sky.  When she wakes in the later morning, she and Riley are the only people alive.  Now, one might easily assume the dawning of the zombie apocalypse, or an alien invasion or an epidemic outbreak of biological origins.  But, no; everyone else is just gone.  No monsters, no walking dead, no debilitating disease.  While this scenario may occasionally find safe harbor in our own reminiscences, when it actually occurs to Jenai and Riley, their interactions become the tale’s focal point.  

Riley is constantly looking a t the practical.  How to make the best of the situation, and enjoy its perks.  Jenai constantly consistently thinks the tank is half empty.  She whines, moans and embarks on long introspective searches for meaning in a meaningless scenario.  She takes solace in Riley, but even that is short-lived.

1.1        KEY SCENES TO LOOK FOR:

1.      FLIRTING BY THE HOLY RELICS
2.      RUINING NAP TIME
3.      THE NIGHTTIME LIGHT SHOW

While Riley is baffled by the situation, he is content living for Jenai; attempting to make her happy and spend his time with her.  She is not so practical.   Though she has a man who is devoted to her, she desires more.  He revels in having the ability to live anywhere, while she feels they are imposing.  He likes selecting any vehicle he wants to drive, she thinks its stealing.  He upgrades his wardrobe, she feels like a thief.  He sets up a date night complete with dress up and a homecooked meal, she starts an argument.  It just shows you don’t need the end of the world to realize the propaganda fed to women by feminists and progressive liberals, served no purpose save to turn them into raving lunatics.

Jenai can’t cook, or clean the house.  Riley handles all those duties.  He also does the shopping and keeps a semblance of time in a world where time does not exist.  Jenai wants to sleep all day.  Unfortunately, this set up is reflective of today’s relationships, where men are becoming more self-sufficient and women can offer little of value to the partnership. 

BOKEH is a snapshot film because it offers a series of scenes with no developing plot, no concluding climax and no resolution.  While the story allows for a bit of philosophical and religious debate, it draws no inference in either the debate nor the story.
 
Let’s take a look at the report card for BOKEH:

ACTING = C
CINEMATOGRAPHY = C
SOUND/MUSIC = D
EDITING = D
LIGHTING =C
SCRIPT = F
SFX = D
ACTION = D




BOKEH  is released on VOD and PPV services this weekend.    Gather a cache of friends with a predominant mix of females to males, voluminous amounts of adult libations, and sit and watch BOKEH.  The discussions afterward should make for raucous times indeed, especially from the women, who will try to alibi female behavior in this work.  Could be a night of laughs.

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